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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,307 (some duplicates have been removed)
[applause] [inaudible conversations] >> now we discuss the book "business networks in syria" and the current conflict in the country. this was recorded on the campus of george mason university in virginia, and it lasts about a half hour. >> host: you're watching booktv on c-span2 on the campus of george mason university in fairfax, virginia just outside of washington, d.c.. we're interviewing some of the professors here who also have books, and we're talking now with "business networks in syria" professor head of the middle eastern studies program here at george mason. professor, how would you describe syria's economy as far as its structure? >> guest: syria's economy went through a number of changes. it went from a centralized state hood economy to a mixed economy that involved centralized aspects and some market aspects, but not in the manner that actually allowed the market to be efficient at all. >> host: when did this change occur from centralized to mixed? >> guest: most of the countries, the late developing countries, after the post colonial development, they had a pe
>> tonight, two stories from syria in this special edition frontline. first, as the fighting rages, frontline is embedded with rebel leaders. >> this is the front line of aleppo. you meet people in the morning, and at the end of the day, they're dead. >> with them, street to stree, as they fight assad's army. >> we are returning now, after the attack. it just shows you how brave they are, and at the same time, how disorganized they are. >> guardicorrespondent for frontlinghaith abdul-ahad, takes you inside the battle for syria. and later tonight, the regime responds. >> the regime now is bombarding civilian neighborhoods with artillery, with tank fire, and with fighter bombers. >> how is president bashar al-assad holding on to power? >> the iranians are gaining influence in syria now by the day. >> and what will happen if asd falls? >> there is definitely increasing worry in the united states administration about in whose hands these weapons are falling. >> these two stories on this special edition frontline. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs
>> now i booktv david lesch talks about the rise of bashar al-assad and syria that he would implement reforms in this country and the syrian rulers repression and violence in recent years. this is just under one hour. >> we have a program with david lesch. david is a professor of middle eastern history in san antonio texas and david has been going to syria for at least 23 years. >> since 1989, 23 years. >> has some experience in that country but most interesting in them reason i most excited to have him talk to us tonight, unlike a lot of people have lots who have lots of opinions about syria david cutugno bashar al-assad which is a pretty unique expected for an academic in particular and david wrote a book in 2005 which held up great hope for the future of syria under bush are. if you recall there is some sense that bashar would a reformer of syria after his father died and we have now discovered that is not the case and he is now written another book called the fall of the house of assad. we are going to talk a bit about that tonight and my first question is going to be, w
issue. obviously, syria has a lot to do in this region and i just thought maybe i'd get your thoughts perhaps on what came out in your discussions. >> well, these issues that we have dealt with are mostly technical. you're talking about specific policy issues. and this of course will leave it up to any transitional government to devise his foreign policy, hopefully in consultation with the transitional democratic parliament. so this is really not our area. this is not our task, but a future democratic government. >> i am a student at georgetown university and my question is, have you considered the idea, sort of the idea that accountabilities could cause members of the regime are individuals or groups assist it with the regime to prolong power or to hold onto power for a longer period of time? and have you considered the idea of pardons and weigh that against the benefits of ending the conflict may be earlier. >> this has been quite sensitive because some syrians feel that they want to actually bring these people who have to be responsible for bloodshed and corruption to be really tin
proceed no. >> ellen book tv the rise of bashar al assad in it syria, the face that many in the weight -- west said that he would implement reforms and the syrian ruler is the group turned toward repression and violence. this is just under an hour. >> tonight we have a program with david lashed. a professor of middle eastern studies and history at the senate study of a texas. and david has been going to syria i believe 23 years. >> 1989. twenty-three years ago. >> started three years. some experience in that country. the reason i am excited to have and talk to us tonight. david got to know bashar al assad having spent a lot of time talking to him, which is pretty unique for an american command academic a particular. david broder a book in 2005 which held out great hope for the future of syria. if you recall, there were is some sense that he would be a reformer in the syria after his father died. discovered that is not the case, and he has no written another book called the fall of the house of assad. so we're going to talk a bit about that tonight. my first question is going to be quit
>> now on booktv, david lesch talks the rest of the shower al-assad in syria, the fates many in the west had you implement reforms in this country was silly and towards repression and violence in recent years. this is just under an hour. >> tonight, we have a program with david lesch. david is professor of middle eastern studies, middle eastern history at the university in san antonio, texas. david has been going to syria for 23 years. >> is going to be -- with 1989? 23 years. >> plenty of experience in that country. the most interesting and the reason i'm most excited to talk to us tonight, unlike a lot of people who talk about opinions, david actually got to know the shower al-assad, which is a unique perspective for an academic figure. david wrote a book in 2005, which held up great hopes for the future of syria under bashar, that he would be a reformer in syria after his father died was now discovered that it's not the case and is now written another book called the fall of the house of support. are going to talk about that tonight. my first question is going to be, when
in the middle east and a message to president assad to as turkey authorizes military action inside syria. >> this is not a mandate to wage war. it is so we can't prepare new development and protect our interests there. we are not declaring war on syria. >> mitt romney relaunched -- why the republicans are claiming victory at last night's u.s. presidential debate. >> coat ♪ >> love them, we do. 50 years ago today, the beatles released their first ever single. we look at how it holds up. decker packwood cause >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america to the problem. the turkish prime minister said today he had no intention of starting a war with syria. but the message is mixed and the tensions are high. the turkish parliament authorize military action against neighbor after syrian shells landed in the turkish town killing five civilians. >> lot this was not turkey's war, but the deaths of one family next to the syrian border have changed kuwait this country sees its neighbors conflicts. the government has called the strike from syria a final straw. left of the isn't family hoped. -- th
syria. the cuban missile crisis of october 1962 is generally accepted as the 20th century's moment of maximum peril. on the 50th anniversary, we have exclusive access to new information that painting even more dangerous image of how the crisis unfolded. paper said to be revealed next week showed that far from the deal being struck neatly, there was a us secret secret -- there is a secret second stage to the standoff with massive implications for the world. >> the cuban missile crisis did not end on october 28, 1962. cuba was going to become a nuclear power right under the nose of the american state, 90 miles from florida. >> there was a lot of potential for at least another three weeks. we were still at the highest state of alert short of nuclear war. >> i call on chairman khrushchev. he has an opportunity to move the world back from the abyss of destruction. >> people around the world breathed a huge sigh of relief when the soviet president nikita khrushchev agreed to withdraw missiles from cuba. in return, president kennedy pledged the united states would not invade cuba and woul
for our families for the future of this great country. now discussion about syria's war which has caused the death of over 30,000 people. politic analyst that they heritage foundation examined russia's role in the conflict and the support of this regime. this is an hour and a half. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our claman opportune -- auditorium on our heritage.org web site as well as joining us via c-span today and in the future. we would ask everyone in houston make sure your cell phones have been turned off this week prepare for everyone's benefit in recording of today's program. we will post the program in 24 hours on our heritage web site or everyone's future reference. hosting our discussion today is.there steven bucci with the homeland security in our douglas and sarah allison center for foreign-policy studies. is focuses cybersecurity as well as defense support to civil authorities. dr. bucci served in america for three decades as an army special forces officer and top pentagon official and commanded the third battalion special for
's retaliation against syria continues. a response after five turks died in the syrian attack across the border. a burial takes place and nato condemns the assad regime. welcome to gmt. david eades. coming up, with an audience of 50 million to impress, as romney gained ground on obama in the first of the televised presidential debates? >> it is not moral for my generation to keep spending more than we take in, knowing those burdens of will be passed on to the next generation. >> i promised i would fight every single day on behalf of the american people, the middle class, and all those striving to get into the middle class. kept that promise. >> also -- ♪ ♪ you know i love you >> 50 years since the beatles released their first single. it's midday in london, 7:00 in the morning in washington, 2:00 in the afternoon in turkey where the parliament is in an emergency session over a bill of the rise across borders military operations in syria. turkey has already retaliated to the mortar attack that killed five people in a border town. despite international calls for restraint, that military respon
called the day after project. they presented a transition plan for syria which they say it started being used by the opposition areas no longer under assad's control. this is just under two hours. >> good morning ladies and gentlemen. i am jim marshall the new president of the institute of peace which i'm delighted to tell you and i'm also very pleased that everyone is here today for a very important, to hear about a very important projects sponsored by the institute of peace. my job principally is to introduce steve heideman. steve stevens or senior advisor for middle east initiatives. he has taught at columbia. he is extensively published, has also directed the center for democracy and civil studies and civil society at georgetown university. he is a terrific asset to the institute. this project is one that is driven by syria with assistance, technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute and sister institution in germany. it is very important that these kinds of efforts be driven by local populations, things that are handed down from the united states that typic
hours that saw it launch multiple attacks on syria and a green light from lawmakers for more to damage the u.s. state department said it considered -- for more. >> the u.s. state department said it considered turkey's response to be proportionate. thursday morning, turkey launched a second round of shelling. some reports say several syrian soldiers were killed. >> the retaliation came after five turkish civilians were killed after syrian mortar fire. turkey says that syria has now apologized for that incident and has promised it would not happen again. >> it is a small turkish town bordering war-torn syria. it has come under the line of fire. syrian borders struck a residential neighborhood, killing five civilians -- syrian mortars struck a residential neighborhood, killing five civilians. cross-border buyer has struck 37 times since the start of the syrian uprising -- cross-border fire has struck turkey several times since the start of the syrian uprising. the government says this bill is not a declaration of war against syria. >> turkey is not a country that wants war. it is a countr
of syria still trying to ignore the conflict -- one region of syria still trying to ignore the conflict. in las vegas, the housing crisis has left people wishing they had not taken the gamble. >> i was left over extended. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. it has now been four weeks since the attack on the libyan consulate in benghazi, which left the u.s. ambassador and three others dead. today, american rule makers were demanding answers about whether the levels of security were enough. testifying before a congressional committee, state department official said the correct number of agents were in place. during this election season, this issue has become controversial. our north america editor reports. in the american ambassador to libya, chris stevens, and three of his colleagues -- >> the american ambassador to libya, chris stevens, and three of his colleagues died in the attack. they had repeatedly asked for tighter security. initially, the american government the attack to protest against an anti-muslim film. now they say it was a t
in the middle east, on the mediterranean sea, next door to syria. sop observers are concerned that the violence that is going on in syria could spread to lebanon or it has already. last friday a carbomb went off in the lebanese capital of beirut. three people were killed including the country's intelligence chief. some lebanese officials blamed syria for it. yesterday, after the intelligence leader's funeral, protesters fought with security forces in beirut. police used tear gas to break up the protests. several people were reportedly injured. >>> is this legit? someone is officially recognized as a saint when he or she is canonized. this is true. in the roman catholic church, canonization is the act of recognizing someone has a saint. >> the roman catholic church recognized seven people as new saints over the weekend. the canonization ceremony had history, as well. a native-american was determined a saints. pope benedict xvi and other worshipers celebrated the new saints. a member of the mohawk tribe, sometimes known as lily of the mohawks. she converted to catholicism and served as a nun. >>>
the u.n. and an apology from syria. turkey still points the finger at damascus saying syria has been causing trouble for many days. welcome to gnt. coming up in the program, thousands of protesters in jordan demonstrated demanding political reform and new elections called by the king. he wears it well. 50 years since 007 hit the silver screen. we bring you nostalgias with the world's most famous -- nostalgia with the world's most famous spy. the turkish government insists it will respond forcefully to any of cells on -- assaults by syria on the turkish people. the country does not intend to start a war with syria but he has the backing of parliament to act with force if necessary. the turkish foreign minister spokesmen told the bbc it was in syria's hands to insure calm returned to the area. >> there were schelling's in the last 10 days. -- shelling in the last 10 days. the thelling was huge -- the shelling was huge and painful. we do not want to declare a war, but we have to prepare for any eventuality to protect our citizens. >> we are in the border area with our correspondents in
support for mali's embattled government but says it will send no combat troops. >> the plight of syria's refugees worsens, and the eu calls on countries to work harder to resolve the crisis. >> the u.s. election campaign is gathering momentum in its final two weeks. u.s. president barack obama and his republican challenger mitt romney have had their final tv debate. >> they sparred over foreign policy where the president is perceived to have a clear evanish, but with the economy on the minds of most -- most voters, the candidates repeatedly reverted to domestic policy to win support. >> with two weeks until the election, the last debate between u.s. president barack obama and challenger mitt romney is dominating the news cycle. the topic was foreign policy, and viewer polls showed romney struggled to distance himself from the president. >> romney has pretty much to reach his breaking point. he has no argument anymore, and he never answers questions straight up. >> i thought last night, it showed that both romney and obama are pretty much in sync with foreign policy. >> with a race that
to bash shard al assad's regime in syria, which goes against american policy and also with no air cover of any kind, no american planes there to assert air sovereignty it is also an open corridor for the israelis should they ever want to attack the nuclear installations in iran which is something the obama administration itself is trying to discourage. another factor is al qaeda in iraq is not a threat to the american homeland but it's become more active in iraq and it's become more of a factor in syria which is also something that runs counter to american policy. so i think given the considerable sacrifice the united states made in iraq it is uortunate the strategic outcome is not more consonant with american interest. >> the middle east is a safer place with sd saddam hussein off the table. do you think that's true? >> i think, people ask me all the time, it was worth it? the way i -- the way i, in my own head, have tried to resolve that question is it depends what iraq backs over tecomes the nexd that depends to a considerable extent, on what american influence can be brought to bear
problems. one of the problems they talked about at both places was syria. another was middle east protest about a film that attacked mohammed and the third was iran and nuclear weapons. we begin with the former president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to win but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as opposed to 51. so a lot of the policymaking will be pushed into the budget and he'll just have to pick up one or
between the u.s., russia and syria. a pal discuss the syrian support of the -- a panel discusses russian support of the syrian civil war. this is about an hour and a half. >> we welcome all of you joining us on heritage foundation and on c-span. we ask that you turn off yourself funds as we begin recording for the benefit of today's program. the we will post for everyone's future reference. hosting our discussion today is dr. steven bucci. his focus is special operations and cyber security. he commanded the third battalion fifth special forces and also became the military assistant to donald rumsfeld. at his retirement, -- prior to joining us, he was a leading consultant on cyber security. please welcome the in -- join me in welcoming steven bucci. [applause] >> we have a very timely subjects to discuss, and i think we have a great panel of experts that will be doing be discussing to get us started. i have been interested in this because one of the first things i did was testified before congress about the weapons of mass destruction threat that syria and the somewhat untimely demise mig
and lester holt in afghanistan, and ann curry inside syria. >>> and trouble in the skies. canceled flights, emergency landings, seats coming loose in flight. a tough time for american airlines, and for the thousands of customers who fly every day. "nightly news" begins now. >>> good evening. at this point you have to assume both men have the facts down cold. one of them, after all, has been president for four years. the other has been running for longer than that. barack obama and mitt romney are both nearing the end of intense debate prep, and coaching sessions. and at this point, they're designed either to create or prevent that moment that we've all seen that can somehow change the race. and with millions of americans watching these debates like a kind of super bowl of american politics, the stakes are high as the two men face each other in denver, just two days from now. we begin tonight with nbc's andrea mitchell in our d.c. newsroom. andrea, good evening. >> good evening, brian. it is the political super bowl, or perhaps the world series. mitt romney, behind in all battleground polls
a russian passenger plane to land, saying the plane was carrying weapons to syria. >> the nobel prize for literature goes to a chinese writer. >> the first international day of the girl. we will look at how young girls are fighting for their rights. syria's prime minister is defending his country's interception of a russian passenger plane headed for syria. >> turkey says the plane was carrying weapons and munitions and military supplies for the syrian army. >> syria has condemned the act as air piracy. russia accused turkey of endangering the lives of the passengers on the plane. >> the story has been dominated newspaper headlines in turkey. ankara says it had information the aircraft was carrying military equipment and that it had no alternative but to force the plane to land. the incident has further increased tensions between damascus and ankara, but the turkish prime minister is unapologetic, saying if the plan -- the plane had not been intercepted, the cargo would have reached syria's defense ministry. moscow has accused turkey of endangering the lives of the russian citizens wh
america. amid the seas -- amid talk of a cease-fire in syria or on the ground the death toll continues to rise. and the female factor, as each side tries to win the vote. we find out what is driving the decision. and want an inventor? we have just a place for you. you have to be ready for a trip -- want an adventure? we have just the place for you. you have to be ready for a trip to afghanistan. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also of around the globe. tonight, the syrian government is studying a proposal for the a cease-fire to take place this weekend. earlier, the u.n. posing mediator said a truce -- the u.n. mediator said a truce had actually been agreed to. here is this report. >> in rebel-held northern syria, the danger comes before -- comes from above. the regime still rules the sky and rains down terror with indiscriminate bombing. this was a secondary school until age -- until the government bombed it. >> the fighter jets attacked. then they went away. then they came back again. they have just cornered on both sides. >> few days passed without a funer
in new york as the region struggles to recover from the super storm sandy. >> syria and eu membership on the agenda and talks between angela merkel and the turkish prime minister. >> european and north african countries have kicked off negotiations on a huge solar energy project in the sahara desert. u.s. president barack obama has arrived in new jersey to tour the devastation left in the wake of super storm sandy. >> obama was joined by new jersey governor chris christie, who is republican, but christie has praised the way the president has handled the crisis. they viewed storm damage by helicopter. obama will also be meeting with residents and emergency workers. >> cleanup work is in full swing on the east coast after sandy flooded cities, washed out bridges, and caused billions of dollars in damage. >> but new york city is making it clear it is back in business. mayor michael bloomberg rate in the opening bell at the new york stock exchange, which was closed for two days. >> the storm killed over 40 people on the east coast and caused unprecedented damage. >> life is slowly returni
u.s. military involvement in syria. but they clashed over a few key points including military spending, iran and libya. the one exchange, obama chided romney for seeking to increase military spending by an additional $2 trillion. >> governor romney has not spent enough time looking at how our military works. he mentioned the navy and that we have fewer ships than we did in 1916. governor, with your horses and bayonets because the nature of our military has changed. we have these things called aircraft carriers where planes land on them. we have ships that go underwater, nuclear submarines. and so the question is not taken the battleship where we're counting ships, it is, what are our capabilities -- the >> despite caution nonmilitary spending, the two candidates struggled at times to differentiate themselves on key foreign policy areas. asked about u.s. drone warfare abroad, romney said he fully backs the obama administration's efforts. >> let me ask you, governor, because we know president obama's position on this, what is your position on the use of drones? >> well, i believ
is that the in syria is about to engulf 11 on. 11 on remembers a 15-year civil war. now this report from beirut. >> the heaviest clashes overnight or in the northern city of tripoli. at least three people including two children reported killed. disturbances between anti- government protesters and security forces. in recent months, tripoli has been the focus of pro-syrian and anti-syrian sentiment. civil war is being played out on the streets of lebanon on. as in the capital beirut, protesters are demanding the resignation of the lebanese prime minister najib mikati. they accuse him of being unable to protect lebanon from the violence perpetrated by the syrian regime. many in lebanon accuse syria of being responsible for last friday's car bomb attack which killed a lebanese intelligence chief wissam al-hassan. his funeral, thousands of opposition protesters called for their own government to resign banned for syria to end its interference in internal lebanese affairs. lebanon on's embattled prime minister is supported by many western governments who see him as a stabilizing figure. the u.s. secr
we see in syria today with more than 30,000 dead and no end in sight. from the beginning, i think it's fair to say that the obama administration was behind the curve on following events in syria. in part i think it was because of ideological baggage it carried when it entered office which led to wishful thinking about the supposed benefits of engaging the assad regime. in part i think it was a horrible misreading of the nature of the assad regime and the possibility of negotiating a diplomatic transition to a new government. and i think in part it was due to an insistence on multilateralism almost as an end in itself which hamstrung u.s. policy and pushed decision making to the united nations which was paralyzed by a lack of consensus and the threat of a russian and chinese veto. the obama administration entered office determined to improve relations with the assad regime and initially soft pedaled its criticism of the regime's hostile policies including its violent crackdown on its own people. it did this despite the assad regime's deep-rooted hostility to u.s. policy in the middle
've seen nation after nation a number of disturbing events. in syria, 30,000 civilians having been killed by the military. we see in libya an attack, i think we know by terrorists of some kind against our people there. four people dead. our hearts and minds go to them. mali has been taken over by al-qaeda type individuals. we have an egypt, a muslim brotherhood president. so what we're seeing is a pretty dramatic reversal in the kind of hopes we had for that region. the greatest threat of all is iran, four years closer to a nuclear weapon. we're going to have to recognize -- i congratulate the president on taking out osama bin laden and going after the leadership in al-qaeda. we're going to have to take a robust strategy to help the world of islam and other parts of the world reject this radical, violent extremism. it's certainly not on the run. it's certainly not in hiding. this is a group that's involved in 10 or 12 countries and it presents an enormous threat to our friends, to the world, to america long-term. and we must have a comprehensive strategy to help reject this kind of extrem
it alone. fighting continues in syria this week. we speak to the former secretary general of the united nations, who has issued a stark warning about the syrian conflict. >> if they cannot come together or find a way to work together, then we are in a really, really hopeless situation. >> on board the africa express', the train which runs on music. hello. spain is poised on the brink of a bailout this week, but as the country's economic woes mount, there are cracks appearing within the complex relation between barcelona and madrid. catalonia is not germany, but the region is the economic powerhouse of spain, and nationalists there resent subsidizing other regions and in making their voices heard. >> of catalonia does one day get its own air force, it will probably be able to afford something better than these. on the beach in barcelona, the air show is a welcome distraction. spain's richest region is now at the center of the crisis with madrid committed to the austerity. there is now a rising demand in catalonia for independence. >> my feeling is that the spanish government totally reje
libyan ambassador to the u.s. and former u.s. ambassador to syria on state department officials and analysts specialize in the middle east starting live at 3:00 eastern, an hour from now and we will have on c-span2. >> would you support military action in iran? >> if need be, yes, as a last option. >> under what conditions? >> if sanctions don't work. if they are close to and about to have the ability to develop a nuclear weapon we use every option possible as will israel and that would be the last option we use but you have to have it ready to use. >> we stand with israel and iran, the military option should be on the table. >> under what conditions? >> we had better exhaust everything else. at the end of the day, if that is what is needed, i am -- i don't know what they need. maybe i can watch but i will be the first -- we have an honest discussion about what is needed. >> with two weeks until election day follow the key house, senate and governor's race on c-span, c-span radio and c-span.org/campaign2012. we will have more campaign 2012 coverage coming up later today. bobby s
? >> pelley: margaret, thank you. in syria's civil war today, artillery fire apparently missed its mark, crossed the border and fell into neighboring turkey. five people were killed and a dozen were wounded. turkey responded by firing shells into syria and late today the white house said it stands with turkey, a u.s. ally. inside syria, one of the world's oldest cities is being turned into rubble. four massive bombs tore through the main square of aleppo today. the pictures are astounding. buildings were leveled, victims trapped, at least 40 dead. this was a city of three million people. the civil war began as a popular uprising against the assad dictatorship which has ruled syria 42 years. one of the most experienced war correspondents covering the civil war in syria is our clarissa ward. she's recently returned from aleppo and joins us now at the broadcast center in new york. clarissa, what can you tell us about who might have been behind these bombings today? >> reporter: well, scott, so far no group has actually claimed responsibility for today's attacks, but there is no doubt that
his country is not far from war with syria. >> thousands of jordanians call on the keen to speed up democratic reforms. >> and golden anniversary -- james bond sirs 50 years in her majesty's secret service. -- james bond's serves 50 years in her majesty's secret service. >> tensions are escalating in the border region between turkey and syria after further shelling by both sides and a deadly attack on the turkish border on wednesday. >> just a day after being granted more powers by parliament, the president said that turkey was not interested in war but that it was not far away from it either. he also warned that anyone who tested tricky's decisiveness would be making a fatal mistake. his comments came -- no casualties were reported, but turkish soldiers returned fire across the border. as the, the u.s. security council condemned syria for firing mortars at turkey earlier this week, an attack in which five people died. for the very latest, let's go straight to ankara where thomas is standing by for us. tell us more on this latest incident. what more do you know? >> we know that fede
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,307 (some duplicates have been removed)